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Discussion Starter #1
any views about whether to run in or not, I know that the offical view is that this is not necessary, but being old school I still take it very easy in the early life of the car. Keeping off hard throttle and steady braking etc, I am sure it pays dividends.
 

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On a non high revving car, it's not going to matter, the components are made to such fine tolerances now that you don't have to wait for them to bed in. Just drive normally.
 

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Mokkadna said:
Always run my new cars in properly.
Does this mean you keep below 2500rpm? This obviously doesn't stress the engine, but how does it properly prepare the brakes?
 

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And yet all of the major brake manufacturers recommend a sequence of hard braking from 70 to 20 mph repeated between 15 and 20 times to fully bed new pads into new discs.
 

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I'll be honest, since i've taken ownership of my Mokka I not only 'drive like a Wendy' but I look for the biggest car parking space available to prevent any accidental bumps.....i've always looked after my previous cars (washing + hoovering) but with my new Mokka i've taken things to a whole new level. I've even resorted to clearing out the garage to tuck it away when its not in use.
So for the first 1000 miles or so, i've taken things very carefully, bedding the motor in and I must admit i'm enjoying the journey's to and from work as the stress levels as a result of fighting my way through traffic have vastly improved. Thank you Vauxhall for building the Mokka and making it such a lovely driving experience.....right where's my key?
 

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Engines now a days don't need bedding in like engines if yesteryear. It's more for the brakes. Bedding them in properly
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks for the comments, it seems to be that taking it easy for the first part of the car's life makes sense for brakes and engine.
 

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Taken from Zeckhausen racing website
When following these instructions, avoid other vehicles. Bedding is often best done early in the morning, when traffic is light, since other drivers will have no idea what you are up to and may respond in a variety of ways ranging from fear to curiosity to aggression. A police officer will probably not understand when you try to explain why you were driving erratically! Zeckhausen Racing does not endorse speeding on public roads and takes no responsibility for any injuries or tickets you may receive while following these instructions. Use common sense!

From 60mph, gently apply the brakes a couple of times to bring them up to operating temperature. This prevents you from thermally shocking the rotors and pads in the next steps.

Make eight to ten near-stops from 60mph to about 10-15 mph. Do it HARD by pressing the brakes firmly, but do not lock the wheels or engage ABS. At the end of each slowdown, immediately accelerate back to 60mph and then apply the brakes again. DO NOT COME TO A COMPLETE STOP! If you stop completely and sit with your foot on the brake pedal, you will imprint pad material onto the hot rotors, which could lead to vibration and uneven braking.

The brakes may begin to fade after the 7th or 8th near-stop. This fade will stabilize, but not completely go away until the brakes have fully cooled. A strong smell from the brakes, and even some smoke, is normal.

After the last near-stop, accelerate back up to speed and cruise for a while, using the brakes as little as possible. The brakes need only a few minutes to cool down. Try not to become trapped in traffic or come to a complete stop while the brakes are still very hot.

If full race pads, such as Hawk DTC-70 or Performance Friction PFC01 are being used, add four near-stops from 80 to 10 mph.

After the break-in cycle, there should be a slight blue tint and a light gray film on the rotor face. The blue tint tells you the rotor has reached break-in temperature and the gray film is pad material starting to transfer onto the rotor face. This is what you are looking for. The best braking occurs when there is an even layer of of pad material deposited across the rotors. This minimizes squealing, increases braking torque, and maximizes pad and rotor life.

After the first break in cycle shown above, the brakes may still not be fully broken in. A second bed-in cycle, AFTER the brakes have cooled down fully from the first cycle, may be necessary before the brakes really start to perform well. This is especially true if you have installed new pads on old rotors, since the pads need time to conform to the old rotor wear pattern. If you've just installed a big brake kit, the pedal travel may not feel as firm as you expected. After the second cycle, the pedal will become noticeably firmer. If necessary, bleed the brakes to improve pedal firmness.
 

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This leafletwas in the box with my Godspeed brakes



I was running braided lines & race spec fluid & my brakes were fine on the bedding in I gave them. Not resting your foot on the brake after coming to a hard stop is good advice though. That's what the handbrake is for.

A word of advice for Turbo owners whether petrol or diesel. Always warm up before getting on boost & always cool down after running on boost.Just because the temp gauge isshowingthe water temp is up to normal the oil temp will be lagging behind sometimes by a good 5 minutes or so.

Turbos run at such high temps they can glow red &they rely on the oil feed to keep the bearings cooled as well as lubricated. Shut off the engine when the turbo is still hot causes the oil in the bearings to "cook". Think oil satin a pan withthe gas lefton high. It will smoke & thicken & eventually turn to soot.Not what you want in your turbo's bearings.

A gentle drive off boost back to your house is all it takes to let the oil flow wash away the heat. Some of my friends have cars whichhave turbo timers so that they cannot switch the engine off until the sensors are happy that the heat has been dissipated. It looks really strange when they switch off, get out of the car, lock it & go indoors & the car sits there running. Before anyone asks, the ECUsystem imobilises the car if any attempt is made to drive off without the key.
 

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It can be most frustrating bringing up the rear most of the time whilst adhering to 'old school.'
 
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