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Hi newbie here.
I have a 2 day old Mokka e with 95miles in the clock. Today before my journey the battery was full(195miles)
I did a 44 mile round trip and battery was down to 69% and mileage left was 96! The maths don’t add up for me. Is this normal?
tia
 

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I think you need to give it a bit longer, most batteries need a few cycles before they achieve full capacity, but with all electric cars your mileage will be reduced by lights, heater, air con and wipers, on a cold wet winters night stuck in traffic you might have to make a choice between keeping warm and getting home.
 

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You'll know you're in trouble if you get a call from the Grim Leccy's
Land vehicle Car Motor vehicle Vehicle Wheel
 

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You’re unlikely to achieve the electric range quoted by manufacturers when you’re driving and the range falls even further if the temperature drops below freezing. It’s why EV drivers find that they can’t travel as far in the winter. That and the increased reliance on the blowers, heater and accessories like heated seats plus driving style and speed all contribute to the mileage obtained. But if you have an overnight charging point at home this would help alleviate a problem.
 

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Hi newbie here.
I have a 2 day old Mokka e with 95miles in the clock. Today before my journey the battery was full(195miles)
I did a 44 mile round trip and battery was down to 69% and mileage left was 96! The maths don’t add up for me. Is this normal?
tia
Mine was similar until I put a few miles on it.
Also it seems to learn how many miles you get per percentage charge which makes understanding how quickly it is being charged a bit of a pain.
However it will settle down and if you try to maintain a certain level if charge as a matter of course then you'll be OK.
If you drive everywhere flat out then you'll confuse the poor thing
What is best for battery longevity is to keep away from fully charging but it's always nice to have it saying you have a 200 mile range even if you only need to do a few.
You just need to learn to plan ahead a little more unless you never do a long journey and always keep 50 miles range in hand.
Most of my journeys are really short but I top up to 80% when I hit 50% just in case.
The batteries had an 8 year warranty when I got mine but I think yours might have an extra year. Keeping a high level of charge is said to be detrimental to the longevity of the batteries and with the aphaling treatment I have had from the dealer I imagine they would try to avoid replacing them even if they do end up holding a lot less charge within warranty.
Hopefully all will settle down or become clear in due course or you'll just take everything with a pinch of salt and realise its pointless worrying about it unless you really do need to make a journey close to projected maximums but I just take it as read that I'll get no further than 160 miles without charging.
 

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Mine was similar until I put a few miles on it.
Also it seems to learn how many miles you get per percentage charge which makes understanding how quickly it is being charged a bit of a pain.
However it will settle down and if you try to maintain a certain level if charge as a matter of course then you'll be OK.
If you drive everywhere flat out then you'll confuse the poor thing
What is best for battery longevity is to keep away from fully charging but it's always nice to have it saying you have a 200 mile range even if you only need to do a few.
You just need to learn to plan ahead a little more unless you never do a long journey and always keep 50 miles range in hand.
Most of my journeys are really short but I top up to 80% when I hit 50% just in case.
The batteries had an 8 year warranty when I got mine but I think yours might have an extra year. Keeping a high level of charge is said to be detrimental to the longevity of the batteries and with the aphaling treatment I have had from the dealer I imagine they would try to avoid replacing them even if they do end up holding a lot less charge within warranty.
Hopefully all will settle down or become clear in due course or you'll just take everything with a pinch of salt and realise its pointless worrying about it unless you really do need to make a journey close to projected maximums but I just take it as read that I'll get no further than 160 miles without charging.
Are the batteries as much as the car, so when batteries are totally u, s, you throw car away aswell
 

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Battery technology is at a pretty fast pace.
I have read about all sorts of things around the corner so let's assume you want to keep the same range but the batteries in 8, 9 or 10 years are half the size weigh a lot less and cost half as much.
I am under the impression the current ones cost about 8k for what is fitted.
So hopefully in 10 years time if the car hasn't rotted away and everything else is on good condition we could have more than twice the range with less weight so therefore better performance and pay the equivalent to just a couple of grand.
Charging rates are dropping significantly but again to upgrade the charger on the car could presently cost thousands given prices I have seen. That said we can already charge to 80% relatively quickly with the right equipment and there are new wall charges coming along which use capacitive technology to charge themselves up over a period of time in readiness to dump the charge into the car quickly.
Who knows, maybe in 10 years time we will have inductive charging plates like we were all talking about 30 years ago.
In any event Vauxhall have built the cars it seems in such a way that in the event of battery failure outside of warranty it might well be the labour that is too expensive rather than the battery cost.
The time to start saving up for a new EV looks to be right now.
 

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The battery-powered electric car is a fad, in 10 - 20 years time it will be as outdated as 3D television.
 

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Or the battery will be replaced with a fuel cell which is good for 100000 miles or we just draw power from the universe or we're all driving boats.
In all fairness looking at how things have not changed that much over the last 30 years I doubt there will be much change in the next.
Hopefully the TV license will be a horror story in the history books like being hung, drawn and quartered.
 

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Battery tech in the last 30 years has gone from stone age to jet age?!
 

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Same with 3D television, or so the guy at Currys try to tell me when he was trying to sell me one.
 
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